Can Your Students Comprehend Texts That They Cannot Read?

Absolutely! Students do understand texts that are read aloud to them that are above their independent reading level. But if they are struggling to read text on their own that is too difficult for them to decode, they will not have good comprehension.  Struggling students in the upper grades are increasingly expected to read texts … Continue reading Can Your Students Comprehend Texts That They Cannot Read?

Learning to Talk and Learning to Read – Part 2

Learning to read is a process that involves both visual and auditory input.  Children must learn to match symbols to sounds and then connect those symbols to make words.  Some children have difficulty remembering the symbols if too many are taught at once.  Reading can be made easier by teaching only a few sound-symbols at … Continue reading Learning to Talk and Learning to Read – Part 2

The Brain – Processing Patterns and Learning to Read

Our brains are programmed to perceive patterns.  Many people enjoy puzzles, whether they are jigsaw puzzles or manipulative puzzles or Sudoku puzzles. They all involve patterns. Art often uses patterns. Architecture and landscaping often follow patterns and they are more pleasing to the eye when certain patterns are followed to achieve visual balance. Math follows … Continue reading The Brain – Processing Patterns and Learning to Read

You Can Teach Your Struggling Child to Read – Now!

Is your child a struggling reader?  Have you tried to help your child learn to read and it just doesn't seem to click?  Learning to read does not come easily for many children, so you are not alone.  Many people will tell you that some children just need to wait longer—but that is just not … Continue reading You Can Teach Your Struggling Child to Read – Now!

Reading Aloud to Children—Inspiring a Desire to Read

Children learn so much from being read to and they love to hear stories read over and over again.  It helps to develop their imagination in a way that viewing TV or playing games on the computer can never do.  When I was young, my siblings and I listened to books that were read aloud … Continue reading Reading Aloud to Children—Inspiring a Desire to Read

Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 3

This activity will help beginning readers and struggling readers build phonemic awareness by associating letters with their sounds. When students learn to spell words by associating the sounds with the letters and to put the letters in the correct sequence, they gain phonemic awareness, which will help them become better readers.  Students need to know … Continue reading Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 3

Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 1

Many people tell me they never learned to spell well.  Others know immediately if they see a misspelled word—it just seems to jump out at them.   Why are some people able to spell well and not others?  Are reading and spelling connected—and if so—should that affect how we teach both subjects? Reading is a process … Continue reading Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 1

You Can Teach Your Child To Read! Week 2

Last week we talked about teaching your child the sounds of the letters of the alphabet.  Your assignment was to teach your kindergarten age child two letter-sounds. This week you will learn how to produce your own letter cards on the computer, and you will teach three new letter-sounds to your child. Make your own … Continue reading You Can Teach Your Child To Read! Week 2

Does It Matter How We Teach Kids To Read? — Part 3

We have previously talked about why the whole word method of learning to read creates problems for many students.  Why is it important to learn phonetic decoding?  What are the advantages of learning to read phonetically?  Does it have to be difficult to learn phonics?  Do kids learn to read faster if they learn to … Continue reading Does It Matter How We Teach Kids To Read? — Part 3