Learning to Talk and Learning to Read – Part 2

Learning to read is a process that involves both visual and auditory input.  Children must learn to match symbols to sounds and then connect those symbols to make words.  Some children have difficulty remembering the symbols if too many are taught at once.  Reading can be made easier by teaching only a few sound-symbols at … Continue reading Learning to Talk and Learning to Read – Part 2

Make Your Own Magnetic Letter Tiles

A while back I wrote about teaching students how to spell. The easiest way to teach spelling is in connection with reading, so children should be learning to spell the same words they are learning to phonetically decode. Spelling is a lot more fun if you teach it with a hands-on activity. My spelling game … Continue reading Make Your Own Magnetic Letter Tiles

This is Your Brain on Reading!

As one who teaches struggling readers how to read, I find it interesting to read about how the brain works.  Some researchers have hypothesized that children who cannot read well have brains that work differently than those of children who can read well.  Brain scans showed that the brains of good readers actually looked different … Continue reading This is Your Brain on Reading!

Sound Bytes Reading: Top Ten Blogs in 2013—Part 1

1 - All Students Reading at Grade Level by the End of Third Grade?  The goal:  Every child reading on grade level by the end of third grade?  No!  The goal should be:  Every child reading on grade level by the end of first grade!  With this goal in mind, we must  use effective research-based … Continue reading Sound Bytes Reading: Top Ten Blogs in 2013—Part 1

Five Spelling Tips for Teaching Beginning Readers

Teach spelling in conjunction with reading. Use spelling to enhance phonemic awareness. Use word lists with consistent patterns to teach spelling rather than random word lists. Use a spelling game to practice spelling words (see previous blog). Save words with difficult spelling patterns for students who are not beginning readers. Beginning readers will learn to … Continue reading Five Spelling Tips for Teaching Beginning Readers

Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 3

This activity will help beginning readers and struggling readers build phonemic awareness by associating letters with their sounds. When students learn to spell words by associating the sounds with the letters and to put the letters in the correct sequence, they gain phonemic awareness, which will help them become better readers.  Students need to know … Continue reading Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 3

Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 2

Beginning readers should be learning to read decodable stories and they should be learning to spell the same decodable words they are learning to read.  Reading can enhance spelling acquisition and proper spelling instruction can enhance reading ability.  Spelling and reading are opposite directions on a two-way street. Learning to spell will enhance phonemic awareness … Continue reading Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 2

Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 1

Many people tell me they never learned to spell well.  Others know immediately if they see a misspelled word—it just seems to jump out at them.   Why are some people able to spell well and not others?  Are reading and spelling connected—and if so—should that affect how we teach both subjects? Reading is a process … Continue reading Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 1

5 Reasons Why It’s Important to Read Aloud to Your Children

Do we really need to read aloud to our kids? Why should we read aloud to our young children? How does reading aloud to our children when they are preschoolers, benefit them later on when it is time to learn to read?  Are there long-lasting benefits that make the effort worthwhile?Here are five things kids … Continue reading 5 Reasons Why It’s Important to Read Aloud to Your Children

Getting Ready to Read – Five Great Pre-School Activities

1.  Give board books to your baby.  Talk about the pictures.  Read simple rhyming stories aloud (helps develop phonemic awareness). 2.  Get a library card. Read books to your toddler every day. Talk about the story (increases vocabulary).  Some favorites: Are You My Mother? The King, the Mice, and the Cheese Go, Dog, Go The … Continue reading Getting Ready to Read – Five Great Pre-School Activities