Can Your Students Comprehend Texts That They Cannot Read?

Absolutely! Students do understand texts that are read aloud to them that are above their independent reading level. But if they are struggling to read text on their own that is too difficult for them to decode, they will not have good comprehension.  Struggling students in the upper grades are increasingly expected to read texts … Continue reading Can Your Students Comprehend Texts That They Cannot Read?

Learning to Talk and Learning to Read – Part 2

Learning to read is a process that involves both visual and auditory input.  Children must learn to match symbols to sounds and then connect those symbols to make words.  Some children have difficulty remembering the symbols if too many are taught at once.  Reading can be made easier by teaching only a few sound-symbols at … Continue reading Learning to Talk and Learning to Read – Part 2

Sound Bytes Reading: Top Ten Blogs in 2013—Part 1

1 - All Students Reading at Grade Level by the End of Third Grade?  The goal:  Every child reading on grade level by the end of third grade?  No!  The goal should be:  Every child reading on grade level by the end of first grade!  With this goal in mind, we must  use effective research-based … Continue reading Sound Bytes Reading: Top Ten Blogs in 2013—Part 1

You Can Teach Your Struggling Child to Read – Now!

Is your child a struggling reader?  Have you tried to help your child learn to read and it just doesn't seem to click?  Learning to read does not come easily for many children, so you are not alone.  Many people will tell you that some children just need to wait longer—but that is just not … Continue reading You Can Teach Your Struggling Child to Read – Now!

Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 2

Beginning readers should be learning to read decodable stories and they should be learning to spell the same decodable words they are learning to read.  Reading can enhance spelling acquisition and proper spelling instruction can enhance reading ability.  Spelling and reading are opposite directions on a two-way street. Learning to spell will enhance phonemic awareness … Continue reading Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 2

Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 1

Many people tell me they never learned to spell well.  Others know immediately if they see a misspelled word—it just seems to jump out at them.   Why are some people able to spell well and not others?  Are reading and spelling connected—and if so—should that affect how we teach both subjects? Reading is a process … Continue reading Spelling for Beginning Readers – Part 1

Phonetic Analysis of Fry’s 25 Most Common Sight Words

In the two previous posts we examined why teaching a long list of sight words should not be necessary when students are taught to read using a strong phonics reading program.  In fact, many struggling readers find memorizing these words very difficult.  In the chart below we will examine the 25 most common sight words … Continue reading Phonetic Analysis of Fry’s 25 Most Common Sight Words

Does It Matter How We Teach Kids To Read?

The controversy of the whole language vs. phonics methods of teaching reading has been going on for a very long time. Both sides claim to have research to back up methodology. How should children learn to read? What can we learn from other disciplines? Do children learn to read by listening to stories? By observing … Continue reading Does It Matter How We Teach Kids To Read?

Learning to Talk / Learning to Read – Part 2

Last week we discussed how infants first begin to babble using the sounds they hear in their native language, and then learn to connect sounds to make words, and still later they learn to string words together to make sentences. Eventually they are able to tell a story about something they have seen or experienced. … Continue reading Learning to Talk / Learning to Read – Part 2